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for certainty and policy decisions. >> earlier today, the ranking member of the senate energy committee, lisa murkowski releaser blueprint for congressional energy policy, which includes drilling in the arctic wildlife refuge also proven keystone xl pipeline. she also discuss climate change issues and why it's important to find common ground in passing future legislation. part of the annual meeting of the national association of regulatory utility commissioners, this is half an hour. [applause] >> thank you and good morning. it's -- i don't know, am i looking at a group of non-football fans? [laughter] i have to tell you, one of the benefits of being from the last to and watching something like the super bowl is our super bowl begins at 2:00 in the afternoon and you're done by 6:00, 630 clock until the kids it's time to do your homework. back here, this thing goes on all night. so i don't know. it showed me out a little bit this morning, but we have the 35 minute reprieve or we could go into a little homework done. so worked for me. i don't know about you. i am honored to be with you yet agai
, that is a great question. triet its current to metastasize tree we are seeing growth in the energy sector through oil and gas you are always finding new fields. ghana is an example in the industry that keeps booming. there are other places around west africa and in this region there's a potential for the oil and gas of in certain quadrants between the borders of mali and more tammie as a you have companies, western companies that are out looking for this. exxonmobil, vp, offshore, all these companies are out there so you have the westerners operating in the region, and if you start seeing the tax like the one that we saw in algeria, that is when to cause some impact economically you are going to see that. the other thing is there is -- i will use france as an example from the four ret base you have 10% of the french population is of some percentage in north africa whether it is first, second, third, fourth generation. you have individuals from within these groups that are sympathetic to the cause or the islamist cause in the region. if you keep this unchecked what you have is a migration flow of
innovatioinnovatio n, infrastructure, new energy, new forms of energy because there will be no consistency is in june we were to set out a roadmap and then we're have a deflationary pack and the fall of the european financial framework. my third principle is that the budget must support the most vulnerable of europeans, those most exposed to the crisis, the poorest of the poor. the funds for their must not only be kept going, they must have more money paid into them. we have the globalization adjustment fund. it is necessary. we are to deal with the restructure. many countries have to face. and the european structural funds is all in the regional programs and, of course, unemployment very young people, which must be a european program with a real priority for the choices we have to make. lastly, the last of these principles that i will be defending in these negotiations that are about to open is a resource system that is more fair and more comprehensible. in the short term the amount of the checks and the rebates must not rise anymore, but in the future we must have real resources. this is vital, oth
, credit, equity, commodity and energy. gfi group is a wholesale broker come sometimes called an interdealer broker. the rest of the industry go back over a century in the world's major financial centers. gfi has institutional clients in transacting exchange listed products and also operates exchanges for things that don't trade on traditional exchanges, instruments that are instead traded over-the-counter such as swaps and other derivative instruments. 15 months ago congress passed the dodd-frank act including title vii that requires when possible that stock transactions be cleared, reported and execute on exchanges, or swap execution facilities. congress recognized global swap workers won't be widely served by firms such as the gfi group. it was great to reflecting on standing role and recognize terms like gfi into the nod the new dodd-frank regulatory framework. the fec and the cftc are still at work on detailed regulations. that will impact the entire process of trading swap in the united states and abroad. getting those rules right now impact not just the large banks and
interfaces and navigation systems. we have sports and entertainment venues as well as a very large energy business. and these are things, shame on us, but we haven't made people well aware of even though we're a hundred years old. >> host: well, mr. taylor, we are aware of panasonic televisions, cameras, things like that. you've got a brand called your tv. what is that? >> guest: your tv is the latest innovation. people want their content the way they want it when they want it. they want to be able to communicate with each other, they want to use twitter, they want to see youtube, they want to shop. we're enabling that in a custom fashion on your tv. so we use facial recognition and voice recognition. you walk into a room, and you say my tv, and immediately the screen shows your home page. it's really the coolest thing. >> host: is it on the market? >> guest: it will be on the market this spring. >> host: 4k, oled. what are these terms? >> guest: so 4k is the latest innovation in terms of high resolution. it's four times the resolution of what you have on your hd-tv at home. it's got the
. we have sports and entertainment venues as well as a large energy business and these are things -- shame on us but we haven't made people will aware of them even though we are 100 years old. >> host: mr. taylor we are aware of panasonic televisions and panasonipanasoni c cameras and things like that. you have a brand called your tv. what does that mean? >> guest: your tv is the latest innovation. people want their content the way they wanted when they wanted. they want to be able to communicate with each other. they want to use twitter and they want to see youtube. they want to shop. we are enabling that in a custom fashion on your tv. so we use facial recognition and voice recognition. you walk into a room and you say, my tv and immediately the screen shows your homepage. it's really the coolest thing. >> host: is on the market? >> guest: it will be on the market this spring. >> host: oled and 4k, what do these terms mean? >> guest: is the latest term and high-resolution. 4k is four times the resolution of what you have on your hdtv at home. it's got the same qualities as digit
employees wanted to do two things, make the world a better place to live and we can find that energy that people have without doing good work in the world, but doing it personally. secondly, we had high respect for rational decision-making and basing it on the facts. not invading the facts. being thoughtful and most importantly giving a clear sense of purpose. .. for everybody in this room and the vast majority of the people on this planet, the single biggest driver of self-esteem is your work because you spend a disproportionate amount of time, effort, and energy at work. that is what makes work important. that is why this issue about unemployment, and underemployment, is way more than economics. it is actually a very spiritual issue because work is spiritually important. i've said many times employee, you do your job well, it's far, far more important to give. you will never fool -- if you don't do your work the best you can do it, you will lower your self-esteem. if you're a college student, college isor work. if you don't do your work the best you can do it, you will lowerror sel
, energy. we can't talk about energy in america or the world without that connecting to the environment. and you can't talk about the environment without talking about energy. and you can't talk about energy and the environment without talking about the economy. because it's job withs, it's growth -- it's jobs, it's growth, a nation's competitive position in the world. and so these issues are interrelated. and as my friends who are here representing their country, their people in america's capital tonight, they understand this, and they understand that the great global issues facing us all -- all 6.5 billion people on the face of the earth today -- are, in fact, global. we live in a global community. that global community is underpinned by a global economy. and so whatever framework of challenges you think we face, they are international. proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, the environment, energy, terrorism, extremism and maybe the most insidious of all, despair. and within the framework of despair comes hunger and poverty and when man is without dignity, not much else matter
give life, you know, give birth, men have the destructive energy, the destructive force and women might not be able to, you know, pull the trigger. of course, arguments about what about pms, would women be able to act rationally during that period? [laughter] would they be somewhat immobilized? how are they going to have supplies in the battle? are they going to have instead of, you know, cartridges in their belt, are they going to have tampons? [laughter] now it seems antiquated. it was the '90s which doesn't feel, i don't feel that old, but -- [laughter] these were common arguments. and sometimes what was guidance got sort of twisted into policies or practices that really sort of undermined the integration of women. for example, in the army there was guidance that, you know, for healthful purposes women should shower every 72 hours. but then i was in a number of units where somehow that was taken as policy x they said women can't be in combat because women must have showers every 72 hours. [laughter] and there are places where i visited where they were doing extended training exercise
and energy to mail out fee disclosure information to participants that are minimally engaged in the plan and are not going to be interested in the expense ratio offered under that plan. that was the regulation well intended, but didn't have all the impact it was designed to have. trying to manage necessary regulation with regulation that's not going to have a bacon pact, just echoing that important part. >> is this going to get us there that make in the plain simpler? >> i think so. do make say difference for people. very valuable, thank you very much. >> i would like to continue, professor warren, senator warren find of questioning because that's very helpful. i remember in order to be the governor of tennessee, walked across the state many years ago and there's no one to talk to do, the cows are along the road. i was thinking if i got elected, would if i could make a tax form for some sort of list that i could hand to somebody who wants to start a business and safe from the state's point of view, this is everything we care about. these are all the taxes on the regulation, complete us.
thought about the counterweights of american central life. .. >> we combined that energy that people have about doing good work in the world but doing it personally. you have to have a right to your own life. a second thing that a high respect for rational decision-making, making logic decisions based on fact, not invading the fact, dealing very thoughtful, very thoughtful process. but most importantly, i think you get a clear sense of purpose and use your thinking capacity to accomplish your purpose. you raise your self-esteem. self-esteem is the foundation for happiness and happiness is the beginning of the game. i don't mean happiness on a friday night. a life well lived. i call blood, sweat and tears have to. when you're 80 and you look back and say that was hard and i'm glad i did it. that kind of hard earned with effort and energy. life will live happiness. that is the end of the game. nothing wrong with money. money is a good thing to happiness is the end of the game. self-esteem properly earned is the foundation for happiness. self-esteem is a complex subject and i want to share o
diplomacy and the creative energy of our people remains unrivaled. no, it's because as the world has changed so too has the leverage and power that can most effectively shape international affairs. i have come to think of it like this. truman and acheson were building the parthenon with classical geometry and clear lines. the pillars were a handful of big institutions and alliances dominated by the major powers and that structure delivered unprecedented peace and prosperity. but time takes its toll even on the greatest edifice. and we do need a new architecture for this new world. more frank gehry ben formal greek. [laughter] think of it. now some of his work at first might appear haphazard but in fact it's highly intentional and sophisticated. where once a few strong columns could hold up the weight of the world, today we need a dynamic mix of materials and structures. now of course american military and economic strength will remain the foundation of our global leadership or go as we saw from the intervention to stop the massacre in libya to the rate that brought bin laden to justice, ther
that will help montana to lead america to energy independence. with responsible development of our coal, wind, oil and gas, hydropower, biofuels and geothermal capacity, we are creating jobs, and we are strengthening our rural economies. but for some communities in eastern montana, the rapid growth associated with the energy boom is creating immediate infrastructure challenges. that's why i've proposed creating a grant program for communities affected by oil and gas development. i ask that we invest $15 million in providing matching funds to affected cities and towns, areas that don't always get a share of the increased revenues that county governments and school districts receive from oil and gas development. there are challenges, but there's opportunities for the whole state with this development. i do hope that you'll join me in addressing those challenges. [applause] we must also meet our responsibility to fix a long-term problem created by our predecessors. i've outlined a detailed plan that will shore up our public retirement systems and do so without raising taxes. i look forward to wo
the e.u. policies are more oriented toward dwrowt. and much of the time and energy in this year of italian government has been devoted precisely to that. and we have been among the pushing facto at the table of the european counsel including adoption for the fact for growth, and also with the daily insistence on the single market being taken more seriously. we all know that europe is based on the single market, but we also know, as prime minister cameron, i heard just say there isn't really single market for energy for many of the services for the digital services in europe. and finally, we insist with some success in the recent european counsel to have a more forward-looking understanding in europe of the role of the good public investment particular for the interconnections for the infrastructure, investment, and this is something that we should also take in to account in our view, when we move in a couple of weeks to, i hope, the negotiations on the e.u. budget. .. it's a ganz commonsense economics and history not to see the potential for economies of scale of an e.u. project
of the energy employee compensation program for department of labor, money has been made available to those workers now suffering from crippling illness. i know ta has designated point person for oic and i commend you for doing so. what i'm hearing from many residents in the district is very few of the thousands of employees in the area or even a way that this program access and its benefits available to them at all. they seem minimal outreach efforts to ensure those in need know how to get the help they so deserve. i read this week about steve totten in a local newspaper. his brother also has cancer. his wife and father both died of cancer. all four worked in the attleboro plant. yesterday he spoke to larry darcy who is diagnosed in may may 292. leroux anonymously to credit your company or the opportunities they gave him and coworkers. over 180 of those coworkers from that he's aware of have contracted some type of cancer. i tell the story not to castleman. the human cost of this development in 1950s and 60s is not unique texas instruments are attleboro, but i believe that t.i. amount the
. the energy relationship between the united states and canada is vital to the future of both our countries. it's an interest we share transcending political lines and geographic boundaries." the letter goes on and talks about how the project is crucial to u.s. energy security. working with canada for our energy rather than getting it from the middle east. the letter talks about thousands of jobs at the -- that the project creates, not only building this $7 billion pipeline but that all the jobs that go to the refineries and the other activities that go with it and talks about safety, efficiency and reliability. now, the letter concludes mr. president, we consider the keystone x.l. pipeline fundamentally important to the future economic prosperity of both the united states and canada. we strongly urge you to issue a presidential permit and act swiftly to approve the keystone x.l. pipeline, signed by governors -- now, remember, senator baucus and i have been working on the effort on behalf of montana. you have got nebraska here. governor heineman just sent a letter in. now here are some of the o
, our sustainable, profitable growth, no question in my mind is going to come from avionics, from energy, from health care, from these markets that we're just scratching the surface in terms of technology applications. >> host: will panasonic still be manufacturing televisions? >> guest: i don't know. >> host: will the word "television" still be in use? >> guest: probably old people like me will still be using the word "television." and i think displays will still have a prominent role in the home for communicating content and information. >> host: joe taylor, chairman and president of panasonic in north america, this is "the communicators" on c-span. "the communicators" is on location at ces international 2013, the technology trade show. more programming next week. >> just ahead, president obama speaks at a ceremony honoring recipients of this year's national medals for science, technology and innovation. after that we're live with a national health policy conference with industry leaders and representatives of government who will discuss what to expect in health care policy this year.
the effects of rationing on the people's energy levels, their diet, their morale, spirit. he worried about everything. no detail was too trivial. for example, he worried that british beings would not get enough sugar to get through the winter. sugar was rationed. when he was asked by a staff what they should do about providing fish, he declared the policy to be, quote, out most fish. the supply of salt and vinegar remain stable important for chips or french fies as we call them. i hope you'll read my book with new information about the wisdom of win winston churchill. there's an interesting story about eggs which is too complicated to tell you about here. i hope i bring to light the two sides of the great man. the effort he put in to getting adopted the policies he felt to be in his country's interest and the human side of chumpleg hill. his huge enjoyment of life, the excube rains and charm and energy and capacity for work. his kindness and humor. his courtesy to the guests and generosity with friends. he once promised, quote, i hope i shall be able to provide a bottle of champagne and an
it and that is a critical, of critical importance. and one example of that is all of the energy that went into getting the larger institutions out of t.a.r.p. while forgetting about almost the hundreds of smaller banks that were in t.a.r.p., and there are still nearly 300 million small institutions, and so as well as the struggling homeowners who need assistance, and so we have been trying to remind people don't give up on the people better still feeling the effect of the financial crisis. and that is what is critically important. >> host: battleground in washington, hello. >> caller: good morning. i've been following this fairly closely for the last five years. i have noticed brian lamb has had some interesting interviews and i have seen sheila bair from the fdic and i think on bill moyers at one point, but i think that the biggest point everybody seems to be missing is it's not whether or not people are receiving bonuses for who is paid back how much of t.a.r.p., who cares so much the feedback but the big point everyone seems to be missing is the glaring contradiction for the 70's, 80's and 90's as
, and the united states will be able to understand how this can happen. the u.s. will become an exporter of energy with the changes that have happened there. we need much more focus ourselves. at the end of the day, it is always about jobs and that means injecting growth into european economies as a result of jobs that are being created for millions of young people across tiernan and give them hope and inspiration and motivation that politics actually >> one of the things that we should be doing, is to pick the low hanging fruits, and they are out there. we could finalize the trade agreements. we are hopeful that this is what we should be doing. we were so eager to finalize this. why is that important? it is important because energy efficiency is cutting edge in terms of using our energy much better and more efficient. we can also make a good business out of that. so i think that we need to focus on the low hanging fruit. we need to do the opposite, which is to use it, and something that gives us a competitive advantage in the global competitiveness. this is what we should be focusing on. this is
implemented carbon pricing. many invest far more than we do in renewable energy. the united states is falling behind rather than leading. even china, today's biggest polluter, recently committed to reduce the amount of carbon it emits relative to its economic output. and in 2009, china surpassed the united states of america in renewable energy investment. looking at all of that, it is hard to imagine that those who will suffer, those who will be displaced, those who will lose their ancient livelihoods all around the world will look benevillbenevolently upon our n. it is hard to believe that they will not resent that they are forced to bear those burdens as the price of our carbon economy. one can readily imagine extremists who wish to rally disenchanted people against us, even to violence against us, finding fertile opportunity where that resentment festers. will it not be? as daniel webster said, an argument against our experiment? will it not be an argument against our experiment that our democracy, our great american democracy, seized in the grip of polluting special interests or fringe po
and use the system with a sense of enthusiasm and direction and energy. i have no doubt about that. and it all has to do with the amount of progress we expect out of congress and whether or not we are smart enough to put this problem solving coalition together which can achieve results. then beyond that, if we can enhance the believe devotee of congress through simple things like reorienting the schedule so as joe said more time is wasting traveling to and from your district and actually sitting in washington touring the work of the people coming and if we can do simple things like no budget, no pay if you can't create a budget of spending bills by the time certain coming you have to get paid. some simple governing principles you know, if we get it close to the finish line come anywhere near getting done, the american people are going to cheer this on because they know that it's the right thing to do. you know what that is going to do? it is going to stimulate a sense of believe ability in our system and our system needs this desperately. part of what we are trying to do is not onl
. good morning, everyone. what an amazing energy in this room come as a thank you for being part of it and giving us the opportunity to share comments with you. i really think it is actually simpler then everyone makes the scene. i have never ever met a member of congress, house or senate, that did not want to make our country healthier, better, stronger for the future. we can figure out a way to get there. that is what this is about. putting the country first and doing what are country does every day, working together to get the job done. with this audience you will pull your members of congress and encourage them to join this group and to start solving the problems of the greatest nation in the world. gabba suing think you for having a survey. [applause] >> good morning. i represent connecticut's fourth congressional district. this system might think, one of the most diverse congressional districts in the country. i have the town's of greenwich where hedge fund managers and corporate executives and what not. the city of bridgeport, conn., which is one of the poorest cities in t
believes that its experts know that what we need in terms of energy is green energy. so we're going to channel a lot of resources to green energy companies. but it's not just democrats that do this sort of thing. i was writing this morning about how the state of virginia has been trying to centrally plan the love lives of virginians for 100 years. they tried to keep the mentally feeble from reproducing the they tried to keep people of different races from marrying. now to try to keep people of the same sex from marrying. and in all these cases it really is, we experts know better than these people who should marry, who should love, how people should live. we've got a government that subsidizes marriage for some people and bands it for others. that is the fatal conceit. that is central planning. thinking that you can centrally plan love. so with individual rights. we're spontaneous order. and then the third key element is limited government, which is what protects individual rights and the spontaneous order. we always say at cato, a government of delegated enumerated and thus limited
couple days is the notion of the energy and excitement we've seen around the issue as it continues to grow, keeps going at new innovations, new partners. the people coming to fight this ancient crime. less and less of it the last few years to find myself walking into a room and having to explain what trafficking in persons face. a much unlikely to be someplace of people is that i did my dissertation i'm not going steady net. or if there were certain age, make some you need to work on this. or if i'm an academic setting, how to get professors to buffer a trafficking course? i will say what we think trafficking is before this talk is over. it's always good to go back to principles and different definitions out on the table. no longer is it that strange moment when people say you work on slavery, what do you mean you work on human trafficking? the justice department's civil rights had a business card with my title before we called this human trafficking which those of you who've been around a few years back remembered only dates back to 2001. is the involuntary servitude toward nader
spend a lot of money and a lot of time in a lot of energy to mail out and send out the disclosure information to the participants who in the first place the minimal engagement in the plan they are not meant to be interested in the expense ratio of every fund that is offered under the plan so that is the kind of regulation that is well intended but in the end really didn't have the impact that it's designed to have. so, trying to manage the necessary regulation with the regulation that isn't going to be a big impact just echoing what they said is important. >> is it going to get us there by making it plain and simple? >> senator warren's line of questioning because i think it is a very helpful. i remember to be the governor of tennessee i walked across the state many years ago and when i was out there with nobody to talk to they were along the road. i was thinking that if i got elected what if i could make a tax reform or some sort of left for somebody to start a business and then for the state's point of view this is everything we care about. this is all the taxes on all the regul
of brands. they shop for beverages, they might buy pepsi, gatorade, lipton tea, root beer, energy drinks, bottled water, if there health-conscious they might buy naked juice. for breakfast they might buy captain crunch breakfast cereal, and jemima, meals and snacks they might buy lay's potato chips, sun chips, cracker jacks, burritos or ruffles. what the consumer probably doesn't realize is all of those brands are owned by pepsi. pepsi is the largest food company in the united states if you want to call those items food and it is the second-largest in the world. they might buy a nasty product. and won't go through all the nasty --nestle brands. they had $10.5 billion in profit. patty had $6.4 billion in profit. nestle is the biggest producer in the country. we have just a few companies that are controlling all of those brands. 20 companies controlled highest percentage of brands in the grocery store and of those, 14 of those brands control organic food. so big food is controlling what people see. then the grossly conglomerate, walmart leads the pack along with kroger, wal-mart is by far
of problems. what is going to be the new energy policy? what is going to be the policy toward nuclear energy? the aging population. i could run on. territorial disputes with its neighbors, you know, china, korea. so there are a lot of different problems, but i think it is a crisis opportunity situation. the chinese used the expression. in japanese it is very similar, and so i think that the new prime minister is the right person at the right time to take these steps, but not limit them, as i said, to adjust monetary and fiscal, take advantage to meet all of these other problems and turn them into a virginities one last point, and then i will mention japan at the end of my brief remarks here, my good friend who died a number of years ago, a brilliant economist and a new japan very well. he taught at mit, always concerned that one day the high amount of government debt in japan would catch up to him, notwithstanding that over 90 percent of it is held by japanese. of course, know it is 235 percent of gdp, the largest of any developed country in the world. and this is something that has to be ta
policymakers and is contributed to the debates and health care, climate change, renewable energy financial services reform telecommunications and international trade issues. in 2007 he joined other former senate majority leader's howard baker, george mitchell and bob dole to create the bipartisan policy center which seeks to find common ground on the nations most pressing issues. these days he's a senior policy adviser at dla piper government affairs and global board. today. today senators subfour will discuss his new book "the u.s. senate" fundamentals of american government written with charles robbins. in it he explains the historical detail of the 100 member body and has worked in the past something i suspect we all wonder about at this particular time. tom daschle. [applause] >> david thank you very much for that generous introduction and thank you very much for the opportunity to be here today. it is a real pleasure for me every time i come to the national archives. i am moved and i'm inspired and for good reason. i think the archives as i'm sure everyone in the round would agree is
, but 70s. which means that we are much older, and as a printer and i will have much less energy than when i was 40 years old. >> gentleman on the left in the second row? >> human brain development was encouraged when grandmothers took over care of the children so that the mother could do other work. thinking about that persist the changes now are the grandmother is not necessarily part of. >> grandparent, grandmothers, taking responsibility for the kids of the parents of the kids go off to it is widespread, and i would say it's the case in many hunter and gatherer societies. grant parents often take responsibility for looking after the children. looking after their grandchildren, thereby freeing up other children to go off hunting and gathering. >> [inaudible question] >> general thing for brain development. well, -- >> [inaudible question] eighty speak about the educational also believes that saw my grandparents, you know, parents don't do as much as grandparents to. >> grant parents acquire information to pass on to their grandchildren. >> the gentleman behind you in the blue? >> yes, t
for oversight and investigation for the house committee on energy and commerce and has also been on the chief oversight counsel for homeland security. and under then senator sam nunn, he was on the senate subcommittee for investigation staff. he has worked at commerce at the justice department, at the state and federal level and today he is the special inspector general for afghanistan's reconstruction we are now entering our 12th year in that conflict, and i wish that we could report that the reconstruction is complete. unfortunately what we do know is that compared to 10 years ago there has been a great deal of progress in afghanistan society and its quality of government but i think as we are all very well aware the reconstruction program has not always gone as expected. we have military units continuing to rotate into afghanistan today. we still have thousands of troops on the ground and we have what is expected to be now a more rapid troop drawdown from afghanistan over the next two years that i think many of our military planners and construction officials had hoped for warrant expected
and care. thank you. [applause] >> some news out of washington energy secretary of state chu announced he will resign once his successor is confirmed in a memo to colleagues received by politico. the former prisoners of he's eager to return to california and academic life. the white house released a statement by the press in which he said steve brought to the energy department a unique understanding of both the urgent challenge presented by climate change and the tremendous opportunity that clean energy represents for our economy. the statement went on to say i'm grateful that he joined to my cabinet and i wish him all of the best in his future endeavors. a quick reminder we have live coverage coming up here on c-span2. and about 40 minutes we will have a discussion on the conflict in northern mali ouis many years ago louis brandeisott wrote that the most important office in a democracy is the office of citizen. a democracy of course is rootedf and based in the notion of ansos enlightened citizenry to read some of us think that democracy is defined by the ritual votings of course in votin
, but 70's, 75 which means that we are finally a grandparent. we will have less energy that when i was 40 years old. so it's something that has to be around. >> the gentleman on our left in the second row. >> i heard something called the grandmother theory which suggested that human brain development was encouraged long ago when grandmothers took over care of the children so that a mother could do other forging activities such as way, way back in forging days. and thinking about that verses changes now with their grandmother is not necessarily part of the picture. >> that, grandparents, grandmothers taking over responsibility for the kids while the parents of the kids go and forage. that observation, as teammate, it is widespread. it is also the case that mentioned. and i would say, the case in most, of many, all of -- hunter-gatherer's societies that have been observed. grandparents are still alive. often it take responsibility, stay in camp and look after the children, looking after their grandchildren come thereby freeing up their own children, the parents of the grandchildren to go of
system, our justice system, and on and on. we have a large number -- the energy -- non-governmental organizations, the public interest movement is wide and diverse that didn't exist very much 50 years ago. what it doesn't have is a cohesive sense that working on related problems that ought to create a sense of movement and some sort of sense that we're indebted to the history, if our history were more accurate so, you know, i think that history is about the future, and that the future is -- if the future is dangerous, then it will be less dangerous and more hopeful the better sense we have of our history, but, you know, i'm a his historian. you can expect me to say that. i'm trying to put it in a different way. yes, ma'am? >> i also want to thank you for the wonderful work you're doing. i have grandchildren i want to share it with. my question is about another age group. as i look around this room i see a number of white males of a certain age who lived through much of the times that you're talking about at some level or another. i'm curious to know what is the response
of rationing on the peoples energy volvos, diets, morale, spirit. you read about everything. no detail is too trivial. for example, he worried british would not get enough sugar to get through the winter. when he was asked by staff what they should do about providing fish, he declared his policy to be quote up most fish. the supply of salt and vinegar remained stable, important for chips or french fries as they call them. i do hope you will read my book with much new information about the wit and wisdom of winston churchill. there's also a funny story, which is too complicated to tell you about here. .. thank you. [applause] >> we mentioned everyone, but in order to have your questions answered, please go to the microphone. please wait until you are recognized. the microphone will come to your area. okay? all right. >> are there any questions or comments? >> yes? >> okay, thank you so much, and welcome to arizona. you need a reference to the second front in the west. as i understand it, in 1942, the americans and british opened up north africa and push the germans out of north africa. then th
to prosperity to year. kutz to things like education and training, energy and national security will cost us jobs and the recovery. it's not the right thing to do for the economy or for folks who are out there still looking for work. the disagree as what we have had over the past few years, democrats and republicans have still been unable to come together and cut the deficits by more than $2.5 trillion through the mix of spending cuts and higher rates on taxes for the wealthy. a balanced approach can achieve more than $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction. that is more than halfway to words the $4 trillion in the deficit reduction that economists and the elected officials in both parties believe is required to stabilize their debt so we have made progress and i sometimes believe that we can finish the job with a balanced mix of spending cuts and more tax reform. the proposal during the fiscal cliff negotiations and discussions with the speaker and others are still very much on the table. the deal's life but forward in entitlement reform and tax reform that i've put forward are still on the tabl
extent, to balance them, overbalance them towards entrepreneurship. we need to invest in our energy. we need to know that there is very little that can be done without money. we have to be in a position to and l. our own efforts. we don't have that kind of money now. we don't own any news broadcast or major organs so we are still depending on other people in their newsrooms where decisions are made often by groups of people that don't include any of us to make decisions to tell stories that would favor us about our situation, about our history, about our journey and that won't happen until we are in a position to make that happen. and so, i often thought when i was a young basketball player and have thought more about it since, that it's much better to own the team than to play on the team. and we have got to get that lesson through our heads. we have got to understand, for instance that in the caribbean there are caribbean mothers who tell their children when they come to the united states to a college, don't associate with african-americans. they do this because of what they see on am
, metastasize. we are seeing growth in the energy sector, so oil and gas, they're always finding new fields. ghana is a great example. the oil industry, its booming. there are other places around west africa. in one region there's potential for oil gas up in certain quadrants between the borders of mali and mauritania. you have western companies out looking for this. exxonmobil, bp, diamond offshore, all these companies are out there, so you've got westerners operating in the region and if you start seeing attacks like the one we saw in algeria, that's going to cause some impact economically. you will see that, but the other thing is, i always use france as an example from a threat to base, you have 10% of the french population is of some percentage north africa, whether its first, second, third, or fourth generation. you have individuals from within these groups that are sympathetic to the aqim cause or the islamist cause in the region, you know. if you keep this unchecked what you're going to have is a migration flow, potential attacks in europe, yeah, people with the dual citizenship. wh
in cuts to home energy assistance. it's very gold chicago where i'm from. $295 million in cuts to the community oriented policing self-s. the cops program. and i know when i talk to the knew municipalities in my district they talk about they layoffs that have already occurred. so, these cuts mean the jobs are lost or weren't contracted created and services are cut to families and smart investments weren't made. ... create a million new jobs by investing in infrastructure and keeping teachers in the classroom. "the balancing act, it offers long-term deficit reduction in a fair and balanced way. ballast means in addition to smart, targeted spending cuts which were not against and raising revenue we need to put people back to work, growth. the third and least talked-about legged deficit-reduction. extremely if not impossibly difficult. austerity measures that cost jobs that only increase our deficit problem will bring down the deficit by decreasing reliance on safety net programs, taxpayers, improving debt to gdp ratio. job losses under sequestration would include 16,000 school te
with you and what happens to you in life is you. you make decisions. you decide how much energy you want to put behind that decision. and i came to understand that i had control of my own destiny. and at that point i didn't hate poverty anymore, because i knew it was only temporary. i knew i could change that. it was incredibly liberating for me, made all the difference. .. >> anybody finishing the second grade was completely literate. he could find a mountain that on the outskirts of society that could read a newspaper, have a political discussion, to tell how the government worked. if you really want to be impressed, take a look at the chapter on education in my latest book, america the beautiful, which i wrote with my wife, came out last year. and in that education chapter you will see questions extracted from a sixth grade exit exam fro.i doubt most college graduas today could pass that test. we have dumbed things down to that level. and the reason that that is so dangerous is because the people who founded this nation said that our system of government was designed for a well-inform
is you. you make decisions and decide how much energy you want to put behind the decision. and i came to understood that i had control of my own destiny. and at that point, i didn't hate poverty anymore. it was only temporary. i knew i could change that. it was incredibly liberating for me. made all the difference. and continue on the theme of education. and 1831, -- came to america to study the country. the europe. s were fascinated. how could a fledging nation already be exciting with them on virtually ever level. it's impossible. -- and so, you know, he said, wow, it's something. let me look at the educational system. he was blown away. anybody finishing the second grade was completely literate. he could find a mountain man on the outskirts of society. the man could read the newspaper, would have a political discussion and tell how the government worked. if you wanted to be impressed. take a look at the chapter on education. in my latest book, america the beautiful" when which i wrote with my life. in the education chapter, you'll see questions extractedded from a sixth grade exit
's policies on taxes, health care, pensions, energy, and financial markets and institutions, among others. mr. hennessy has spent more that 15 years in economic policy roles for senior elected officials. before his time in the white house who worked on capitol hill for more than seven years as economics advisers to former senate majority leader trent lott. since leaving the white house mr. hennessy has been a television commentator, one of the top 25 economic blogs by "the wall street journal." he also served as a member of the financial crisis inquiry commission. mr. hennessy holds an undergraduate degree from stanford and masters degree in public policy from harvard university's kennedy school of government. as chair of president obama's council of economic advisers from january 2009 until september 2010, dr. christina romer was one of the for economics principals who met with president obama daily to design and guide the administration's response to the great recession. dr. romer played a key role in the administration's macroeconomic policy, reform of the financial system, health care ref
institutions, the energy visions and populations in this particular country. so the undeniable progress that we have made, the ethnic diversity that we have observed, and the profound expansion of democracy that we have helped facilitate must be juxtaposed however to the persistence of malignant and often unconscious forces of bye yes that continue to undermine the best potential that we have as american citizens. it gives them the way and we don't know it. you can be a young boy walking down the street with some skills in your hand and saw ice-t and at the phantom and visible by s becomes concrete and definable. the anatomy takes shape in the repulsion of and repugnance to words black or latino or asian or other bodies. just as figments of imagination projected onto the screen of history and what goes on unconsciously what is a stereotype that becomes lethal and deadly when one person seeing another person acts on those stereotypes, that in plus at racism, that ethnic repulsion and all of a sudden this theoretical stuff becomes concrete. stuff that you talk about in classrooms skills over in a
of american democratic institutions, energies, visions, and populations in this particular country. so, the undeniable rain showers progress we have made, the ethnic diversity we have observed, and the profound expansion of democracy we have helped facilitate, must be juxtaposed to the persistence of malignant often unconscious forces of bias that continue to subvert and undermine the best potential we have as american citizens. it gets in the way and we don't know it. you could be a young boy walking down the street with a pair of -- with some skittles in your hand, and some iced tea. and then the phantom invisible bias becomes concrete and definable. the anatomy of bigotry takes shape in the repugnance toward black or latino or asian or other bodies. just as figments of imagination projected on to the screen of history in what goes on unconsciously, what is a stereo type takes shape, and that then stereo type becomes lethal and deadly when one person, seeing another person, acts on those stereotypes, that implicit bias, that up conscious raceism, thatth him in repose, and all that's
and energy assistance is very cool in chicago 295 night dollars and cut in policing services. the new municipalities talk about the layouts that have already occurred. is canceling jobs are lost or were created and services are cut to families and smart investments were made. republicans insist on deficit reduction needs to come from even more severe cut, including social security, medicare and medicaid benefits. the fourth class of america are people other 65 years of age with $20,000 a year. the people is to go after them. but my colleagues and i are offering today is a smarter alternative to post-tax loopholes for individuals and corporations can cut through military waste and create a million new jobs said testing infrastructure and keeping teachers in the classroom. what the balancing act as a salve for a long term deficit reduction in a fair and balanced way. in addition to smart targeted spending cuts, and raising revenue, we need to put people back to worse. growth is the third in the south that they could deficit reduction. that job creation, restored to full potential will b
and nanoelectronics will impact many aspect of the economy. health care, energy, transportation, safety, security, and many more. china and korea understand that the country that leads in nanoelectronics will reap economic benefits way the u.s. has dominated the last fifty years where the microelectronics are. fourth point, i think there are four areas that changes in policies need to be focused. to scare change outcome. first, the federal funding and basic research. even in tough economic times, we must protect the investment in the future. second, is we must make a priority for world class stem education k through 12 in the u.s. it needs to be a national imperative implemented on a local basis. three, high skill immigration reform. i appreciate the leadership that mr. chairman, you have shown and mrs. lofgren on the issues and we look forward to hopefully resolution to it. and in fourth, is exomp hencive tax reform for u.s. companies to complete globally. the world has changed considerably since 1986, the last time taxes were considerably reformed. we must have an environment where u.s. headqua
with revenues, and invest in this economy for education, energy, and infrastructure. it's a three-prorng approach. nij who thinks you can only do one of these and magically a $16 trillion debt wirl val in-- will vanish overnight is in another world that doesn't exist on this planet. i appreciate the debate that goes on here but we need to be honest, realistic, practical, in dealing with these budgetary issues and they will be tough. people will not -- i can see them now, my town hall meetings when i go to them. sale say cut the budget which we will do. don't get me wrong. we will do that. but when i go back to that same town hall meeting they'll say i didn't mean that program. that will be the story. but the fact is we have serious issues we have to deal with so this is not a democrat issue, it is not a republican issue, so when people come to the floor, we should think about this as an american issue. we have to resolve this for the right reasons and we have done some exceptional work over the last four years despite the hurdles, the political slogans and all the other stuff that
use and cities as for parking. we get stuck in traffic jams. 90% of the energy that we use is by automated self driving vehicles. advancing that in education. within the next five years, we are going to have another 3 billion people coming on the internet worldwide. the government can talk to each other, imagine what happens over the next five or so years with technology. it is all because of technology. people like me, engineers, scientists, whole assortment of people. until recently, 50% of silicon valley, the most innovative part of the country. we are reinventing america. it is all about skills. the people that are making this happen are engineers and scientists and doctors and most importantly entrepreneurs. so we have a choice right now. we can reinvent america and create a better world. we can create security that protects us and we can do all of these things right now, all within the next five or seven years. i can guarantee that five years from now, we will be talking about the changes. we are talking about many other things becoming abundant. our entrepreneurs, ou
oriented toward dwrowt. and much of the time and energy in this year of italian government has been devoted precisely to that. and we have been among the pushing facto at the table of the european counsel including adoption for the fact for growth, and also with the daily insistence on the single market being taken more seriously. we all know that europe is based on the single market, but we also know, as prime minister cameron, i heard just say there isn't really single market for energy for many of the services for the digital services in europe. and finally, we insist with some success in the recent european counsel to have a more forward-looking understanding in europe of the role of the good public investment particular for the interconnections for the infrastructure, investment, and this is something that we should also take in to account in our view, when we move in a couple of weeks to, i hope, the negotiations on the e.u. budget. .. in the last 12 months, we have come back to the market. can you tell us a little bit more about the structural economic reforms. particularly repairing
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